From Psychology Today — Paula Davis-Laack writes “Gritty students tend to outperform their less gritty peers, and grit scores are associated with higher GPAs (Duckworth et al., 2007). In one study, grit was a more accurate predictor of whether an incoming cadet would finish his or her first summer of basic training at West Point; more so, in fact, than self-control, academic GPA, Military Performance Score, and West Point’s own Whole Candidate Score, (Duckworth et al., 2007). Grit also predicted those students who would advance into the later rounds of the Scripps National Spelling Bee (Duckworth et al., 2007).

More recently, grit has been shown to predict the success of women lawyers in the country’s largest law firms (Hogan, 2013). This is a big finding in the legal profession because for years, men and women have been entering law schools and law firms as first year associates in roughly equal numbers, yet the number of women making it to the highest levels of partnership has remained static—and really low. As of 2013, the number of female equity partners was about 17 percent. What’s also troubling is that the percentages of women equity partners and women associates in the typical law firm have actually declined slightly in the past two years (Scharf, Liebenberg, & Amalfe, 2014). Encouraged by Hogan’s research, the American Bar Association Commission on Women in the Profession created the Grit Project to educate women lawyers about the science behind grit.

While research shows that grit is a significant predictor of success in different domains, the research shows very little at this point about how a person can develop grit. Here are a few theories…”

Read the full story at Grit: The Secret Ingredient to Success